Summer Reading Program - Marian High School
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Summer Reading Program 2020

This Summer’s Titles

2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment giving American women the right to vote. As an all-girls school, we want to celebrate this momentous occasion by focusing on stories of the ratification battle.  All of these books feature characters (both fictional and real) who show amazing bravery in the face of obstacles and difficulties. In addition, we are planning a leadership conference this fall in collaboration with Mercy and Duchesne.

This summer, all students from all three schools will read the same novel, “Uprising,”  a fictional account of a historical moment. Each student also will read a nonfiction account of the suffrage movement.

 

Titles for the 2020 Summer Reading Program are:

Freshmen & Sophomores:  “Uprising” by Margaret Peterson Haddix
“Roses and Radicals: The Epic Story of How American Women Won the Right to Vote” by Susan Zimet

Juniors & Seniors: “Uprising” by Margaret Peterson Haddix
“Mr. President, How Long Must We Wait?: Alice Paul, Woodrow Wilson, and the Fight for the Right to Vote” by Tina Cassidy

You are expected to procure your own copy of the book and have it read and annotated by the start of the school year. If you’re enrolled in an honors English class for 2020-21, you will receive an email announcing the title of the second book you are required to read. If you have any questions about the program, please email your English teacher or English Department Chair Susie Sisson.

Summer Reading Program FAQs

What is the purpose of the Summer Reading Program?

Reading great literature is the cornerstone of a Marian education. It is the goal of the Marian English Department to provide a plethora of opportunities for our students to engage actively with classical and contemporary works of literature, both during the school year and during summer break. In the words of F. Scott Fitzgerald: “That is part of the beauty of all literature. You discover that your longings are universal longings, that you’re not lonely and isolated from anyone. You belong.” Through the Summer Reading Program, Marian students will read popular and engaging works of literature. By participating in classroom discussions and other projects, they will develop the skills necessary for lifelong learning, and they will become part of Marian’s community of readers.

Besides reading the book, what else do I have to do this summer?

All summer reading must be completed by the start of the school year.

While reading the book, you should annotate the text: write down questions or comments you have about the book and mark the pages of interesting passages. This fall, you’ll be required to complete a writing assignment related to the books.

Over the summer, be sure to check Marian’s website for links to authors’ websites and other interesting information. 

Where can I find a reading guide for this summer's books?

At this time, we don’t have a separate reading guide for Roses and Radicals (grades 9 & 10) or Mr. President, How Long Must We Wait? (grades 11 & 12). Please use the questions and resources in the Uprising reading guide to assist you with your understanding of these books.

If I have any other questions, who should I contact?

Please contact Ms. Susie Sisson, chair of the English Department, at bsisson@omahamarian.org if you have additional questions.

Why are students being asked to read two books this summer?

2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment giving American women the
right to vote. As a school that prides itself on graduating empowered women, we want to celebrate this
momentous occasion by focusing on stories of the ratification battle. All of these books feature characters
(both fictional and real) who show amazing bravery in the face of obstacles and difficulties. In addition,
we are planning a leadership conference for this fall in collaboration with Mercy and Duchesne. This
summer, all students in all grades from all three schools will read the same novel (Uprising).

The anniversary of the success of the suffrage movement deserves to be celebrated. Therefore, we are
adding a second book to our reading list this summer. In addition to reading Uprising, a fictional account
of a historical moment, each student will read a nonfiction account of the suffrage movement. Learning
more about women’s history is what we’re all about. You can’t understand where you are until you know
where you came from.

If I’m enrolled in an honors English class for next year, what else do I have to read?
  • 9th grade Honors Composition and Literature: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. 
  • 10th grade Honors American Literature: The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henriquez. 
  • 11th grade H/AP English Literature: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon. 
  • 12th grade H/AP English Language: Educated by Tara Westover. 
  • 12th grade Honors World Literature: Left to Tell: Discovering God Amidst the Rwandan Holocaust by Immaculee Ilibagiza

Students enrolled in a college prep English class will be required to read two books over the summer. Students enrolled in an honors English class will be required to read three books over the summer.

What if I’m not sure how to annotate a book?

The English Department put together this handy guide for you. Click here to view it. We’ve also included a list of common literary devices. These terms constitute the language of literature. When we talk about books, we use these words.

Where do I get a copy of the book?

The Summer Reading Program books will be included on the list of required textbooks for 2020-21. You can purchase any version of the book (print or electronic, used or new) from the seller of your choice. You can also find all of these titles in print, e-book and audio-book formats in Marian’s library or at your local public library.

How can I use social media to tell my friends about this?

Please use #MarianReads this summer across all platforms. Post pictures, ask questions, make comments about your book. There’s something wonderful about reading the same book as your friends and then getting together to talk about it. Don’t wait until this fall to have those conversations!

That is part of the beauty of all literature. You discover that your longings are universal longings, that you’re not lonely and isolated from anyone. You belong.

 

-F. Scott Fitzgerald